to borrow


to borrow
Fin. [Banque] emprunter

English-French dictionary of law, politics, economics & finance. . 2010.

Regardez d'autres dictionnaires:

  • Borrow — or borrowing can mean: to receive (something) from somebody temporarily, expecting to return it. *In finance, monetary debt *In language, the use of loanwords *In arithmetic, when a digit become smaller than limit and the deficiency is taken from …   Wikipedia

  • Borrow — Bor row, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Borrowed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Borrowing}.] [OE. borwen, AS. borgian, fr. borg, borh, pledge; akin to D. borg, G. borg; prob. fr. root of AS. beorgan to protect. ?95. See 1st {Borough}.] 1. To receive from another as a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • borrow — [bär′ō, bôr′ō] vt., vi. [ME borwen < OE borgian, to borrow, lend, be surety for, akin to beorgan, to protect & BOROUGH] 1. to take or receive (something) with the understanding that one will return it or an equivalent 2. to adopt or take over… …   English World dictionary

  • borrow — bor·row vt: to take or receive temporarily; specif: to receive (money) with the intention of returning the same plus interest bor·row·er n Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. borrow …   Law dictionary

  • borrow — O.E. borgian to lend, be surety for, from P.Gmc. *borg pledge, from PIE *bhergh to hide, protect (see BURY (Cf. bury)). Sense shifted in O.E. to borrow, apparently on the notion of collateral deposited as security for something borrowed. Cf. O.E …   Etymology dictionary

  • borrow / lend / loan —    Borrow is to receive something from someone temporarily: to borrow a book and then return it.    Lend is a verb that mean to temporarily give something to someone : Henry will lend (or loan) Francine a book.    Loan is a noun: a bank loan.… …   Confused words

  • borrow hole — or borrow pit noun (civil eng) A pit formed by the excavation of material to be used elsewhere for embanking, etc • • • Main Entry: ↑borrow …   Useful english dictionary

  • borrow/take a page from someone — (or borrow/take a page from someone s book) US : to do the same thing that someone else has done You may want to borrow/take a page from his book and study harder for your finals. • • • Main Entry: ↑page …   Useful english dictionary

  • borrow trouble — {v. phr.} To worry for nothing about trouble that may not come; make trouble for yourself needlessly. * /Don t borrow trouble by worrying about next year. It s too far away./ * /You are borrowing trouble if you try to tell John what to do./… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • borrow trouble — {v. phr.} To worry for nothing about trouble that may not come; make trouble for yourself needlessly. * /Don t borrow trouble by worrying about next year. It s too far away./ * /You are borrowing trouble if you try to tell John what to do./… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Borrow — Bor row, n. 1. Something deposited as security; a pledge; a surety; a hostage. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Ye may retain as borrows my two priests. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] 2. The act of borrowing. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Of your royal presence I ll… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English